GRAND MASTER KRU (V) VANGELIS XANTHAKIS
WORLD MUAY THAI BORAN GENERAL  TIENCHAI'S ACADEMY
Home | Contact

“Long Live The King”
    His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun
                                                     
 

                                                                                                                                                                                           Home > Related Wing Chun Xanthakis
 

 

                                      

          Wing Chun  kung Fu.




The Art & Science of True Ip Man Wing Chun

Gung Fu Born In The Shaolin Temple & Authentically Handed Down For Over 300 Years

 

                                About 300 years ago, Ng Mui, a Shaolin nun, fled the burning of the Shaolin temple, along with 4 fellow priests. Ng Mui went her own way to avoid capture, and sought refuge in a White Crane temple, where due to her Shaolin experience she immediately became the highest authority. During her time at the White Crane temple, Ng Mui reflected upon her Shaolin techniques and found them to be inefficiently wild and exaggerated. She then went on to develop a more efficient system, based on the most simple and direct movements of the human body, with minimal over-reaching and over-commitment.

Ng Mui met a girl called Yim Wing Chun, who was being harassed by a man who wanted to marry her, forcibly if necessary. Ng Mui then taught Yim Wing Chun how to fight so that she could defend herself from the man who was pestering her.

Yim Wing Chun taught her husband, who taught someone else, who taught someone else. Somewhere along the line, this efficient system of fighting, descending from the Shaolin nun named Ng Mui, was named after her student, Yim Wing Chun, and is known as Wing Chun Kung Fu today.

The system of Wing Chun Kung Fu was eventually passed on to the late Grandmaster Yip Man who heavily refined the system from the state in which he received it. Yip Man had many students, the most famous of which being the late Bruce Lee.

Before Yip Man died, he made a film of himself authentically practicing the system in its most important ways, thus preserving much of the system as he taught it.         
                                                   

 Dragon's  Kung Fu Academy


The Academy was founded by Sifu Vangelis Xanthakis  on 22nd May, 1986  to pass on the traditional teachings of Kung Fu. The training structure consists of 10 levels to cover the open hand forms, wooden dummy set, Chi-Sao and combat application of all techniques. Gradings are conducted three times per year with both minimum lesson requirements and competency at the particular level necessary before the student may apply for grading.
Most students train three times per week, supplementing their class training with private lessons from Sifu Ian Protheroe.
The syllabus structure is as follows:
Year 1 Sil Lim Tao form and application
Year 2 Advanced SLT and Chum Kil forms, Chi-Sao, Entry techniques and combat application. Muk Yan Jong and sparring.
Year 3 Bil Jee Form, Muk Yan Jong, Combat application and sparring.
Although the 10 levels of the system can theoretically be covered in 3 1/2 years, most senior students elect to stop gradings at around level 8, and generally train 4 - 4 1/2 years before completing level 10.
In many schools students are encouraged to "go through" the system as fast as possible so that they can open branches and subsequently increase the revenue to the main school and the Instructor.
At the Academy this is not the case. Most students are interested only in the art and are satisfied with training to perfect their skills. Sifu Vangelis Xanthakis has never pushed a student to open a branch as he feels the quality of the student will reflect the quality of the instructor. Teachers are born not bred. Being a good practitioner does not necessarily make a good teacher.
Private lessons are Monday to Friday 7.30am to 6pm with a one hour break at 12 noon for lunch.
Classes start with a 15 minute warm-up (not wear-out). The whole group then practices Sil Lim Tao form, footwork, basic arm positions and punching.
The class is then separated into graded groups and the students are paired off to train the techniques specified on the night. Formalized lesson plans are strictly adhered to for each of the respective grades to ensure competency at each level.
After the level 10 grading, the traditional weapons of Wing Chun are taught.
These are Bart Jarm Dao and Dragon Pole. Careful attention is placed on both form and application. A structured syllabus for weapons ensures the practical application, attention to detail and appreciation of the historical aspects of weapons training are understood.
Students are required to keep a formatted training diary recording all material covered. This is supplemented by manuals on the open hand forms supplied by the Academy.
Uniforms are compulsory for all students. Traditional Chinese black pants, shoes, black sash, white socks and white T-Shirt with the Academy logo are worn at every class.
Grading bars (9) are fixed to the black sash as they are achieved with Level 10 students wearing a gold sash.

"Destroying the opponent's center line will control his bridge. "

The Centre Line Theory
The Centre Line is an imaginary line down the centre of your body. Striking to the Centre Line causes maximum reaction and damage.

As the Centre Line runs vertically through the body's centre of gravity, and the force of gravity runs vertically downwards in the direction of this line, the body's balance is most affected by the bending of this line. As soon as one part of this line is displaced, the rest of the line must simultaneously move in order to keep the line straight, which is unlikely to happen. In order to effectively attack and defend the body must be gravitationally well-balanced. Therefore in Wing Chun we target the Centre Line to displace part of this line, making the line bend to disturb the opponent's balance, causing maximum reaction to the opponent's ability to fight back.

When striking to anywhere but the Centre Line, the opponent's body can rotate to disperse the force with minimal reaction, reducing the damage of the strike. When striking to the Centre Line though, the opponent's body cannot rotate so easily to disperse the force and reduce the reaction, so the opponent's body must absorb more of the force and therefore more damage is caused.

Most of the vital striking points of the opponent's body are located on or between the vertical planes that join your main weapons (hands) to the opponent's Centre Line. Therefore, when striking to the Centre Line to cause maximum reaction, with straight techniques for maximum speed, you are simultaneously striking to the key target areas including the eyes, nose, temples or head in general, the windpipe or neck in general, the solar plexus, spine or ribs in general, and between the legs, depending on which direction the opponent is facing.



This is why striking to the Centre Line causes maximum reaction and damage, and this is why Wing Chun emphasises the importance of attacking the opponent's Centre Line whilst simultaneously defending your own.    

1. There is no difference in who started to study first; the one who achieves accomplishment is first.

2. Students from the same teacher will differ in their skills

3. Touching the opponent's arm bridge makes the situation more favorable

4. When facing multiple opponents, it is easy to manage the situation

5. When chasing the opponent's arm bridge, beware of being led

6. When pushing the opponent's elbow, beware of being pulled

7. Learning the techniques without developing the skills will never bring any accomplishment.

8. The ideal in Martial Arts is humanitarianism. Accomplishment uses diligence as a goal.

9. When the opponent passes your arm bridge, avert the danger by turning the stance and facing with the appropriate posture.

10. Strike when you should. Do not strike when you should not.

11. Do not be too eager to strike. Do not be afraid to strike. One who is afraid of getting hit will finally be hit.

12. Persistent attacks will surely gain you entry. Staying on the defensive too long will surely get you into trouble

13. The punch starts from the heart. The staff does not make two sounds. A kick does not miss.

14. Power is generated from the joints. Strength originates from the heels

15. Store mental energy with the mind. Move Ch'i with mental energy. Exert strength with Ch'i. Generate power with strength.

16. No harm will come if Ch'i is nurtured naturally. Power can be stored but with enough to spare.

17. Ch'i comes out of the Tan Tien, and travels along the waist, the thighs, and the back

18. Know yourself and your opponent, and you will always win.

19. People do not know the extent of my skills, but I know their abilities.

20. Go along with your opponent's failing posture in order to take advantage of it

21. Glass-like head, cotton-like belly, and iron-like arm bridge

22. You can strike anywhere when your arm bridge has passed beyond your opponent's three joints

23. Pass by the opponent's incoming arm bridge from above. Jam the opponent's bridge to restrict his movement

24. Create a bridge if the opponent's bridge is not present. Nullify the bridge according to how it is presented.

25. Know the difference between Yin and Yang, real and feigned. Take advantage of any available opportunity

26. Sticking to the opponent while shifting hand position shows good control of the situation

27. Being stuck to by the opponent while attempting to shift your own hand position cannot produce the intended result

28. Bong Sau must not remain. Faan Sau should be closely paced.

29. Know your own limit in the use of power. Releasing all out is 90% of the way to defeat

30. The knees lead the stance. The waist links the body. Where the mind goes, the eyes go, and the hands and feet follow

31. Strive to remain calm in the midst of motion. Loosen up the muscles and relax the mind.

32. The three terrors of Wing Chun are Taun Sau, Bong Sau, and Fok Sau

33. Feet and hands work together, and the threat comes to an end

34. Beware of brute strength when facing someone from the same style. Beware of the situation in a confrontation

35. In uniting the waist with the stance, power can be generated

36. In a match do not expect any compassion

37. Grasping the throat is a ruthless technique. Once commenced, it cannot be stopped

38. Storing energy resembless pulling a bow. Releasing power is like shooting an arrow

39. Circular and straight accompany each other. Bent and straight complement one another

40. Extreme softness enables one to be hard. Being extremely natural enables one to be agile

41. Direct the mind to store spirit, not Ch'i, in the body. Otherwise it leads to sluggishness. No power is obtained when occupied with Ch'i.

42. Use alterations in stepping forward and backward. Hands and feet should be closely coordinated

43. Invisible posture. Invisible kick

44. As long as you are sticking to your opponent, you are unlikely to lose. A well trained waist can prevent loss of balance

45. Hand techniques must follow the Yin Yang principle. Strength must be applied with inner power. There is a counteraction to every attack

46. Rapid moves are hard to guard against. Go in when the opponent slows down

47. Kicks lose nine times out of ten

48. The feet are like wheels, and the hands like arrows

49. A hand used for attack serves also to parry

50. Do not collide with a strong arm bridge. Get out of the way and take initiative to attack

51. During sticky hand practice, the hand which has entered beyond the elbow will win nine times out of ten

52. Do not follow, force, or butt against the opponent's hands

53. Destroying the opponent's center line will control his bridge

54. In Bong Sau the forearm inclines, the wrist is on the center line, and the fingers droop. A raised elbow weakens the force

55. The elbow must be strong. Then you can take on any attack

56. If the opponent grasps your arm bridge, do not oppose him with brute force. Go with the opponent's force and change into rolling hands. Turn around the situation to control him



17 KEYS OF WING CHUN 

1. Be ferocious when clashing

2. Be fast with your fist

3. Be forceful when applying power

4. Be accurate with timing

5. Be continuous when applying Fan Sau

6. Do not use all your strength

7. Protect your own posture

8. Be alert with your eyes

9. Unite your waist and stance

10. Coordinate your hands and feet

11. Movements must be agile

12. Comprehend the principles of Yin and Yang

13. Remain calm

14. Be steady with your breathing and strength

15. Sink your inner chi

16. Be commanding with your fighting demeanor

17. Be quick to end the fight

Chi-Gerk (The Sticking Legs)

Chi-Gerk - a sensitivity drill for footwork training and leg attacks - is not as soft and flexible as Chi-Sao, but the sensitivity concept is still to be stressed, as are the rules and laws of the hand movements. The ankle is the wrist, the knee is the elbow, and the hip is the shoulder. In the ideal position, the knee is about heart level with a right angle in relationship to the lower leg, with the foot on the centerline. Chi-Gerk enables the practitioner to develop the sensitivity in the legs for sweeps (Huen Bo/Kau Bo), deflections, redirections (Tan Gerk, Bong Gerk, Fook Gerk) and counter kicks (attacking the pole leg/Dok Lap Ma).

Chi-Gerk is the most advanced level of Wing-Chun training to enhance the practitioner with kicking weapons and skills that enable the practitioner to:

• Break the opponent's lower body horse/gate and attack the pole leg, not spin the opponent off center while the upper body techniques are executed simultaneously.

• Develop close range kicking skills. The knee should land on the body about a fist and a half away so that you can kick the chin from Chi Sau position.

• Develop a sense of feeling in the opponent’s legs and great balance in your pole/support leg while executing the upper body techniques up close.

• Develop lower body intercepting, closing the gap, and bridging skills, going forward, defending and attacking the leg with a leg (Gerk Da Gerk-kicks counter kicks).

Chi-Gerk is first experienced by way of various strength and conditioning drills, somewhat similar in nature to Chi-Dan-Sao and the learning found when beginning arm training. A great deal of strength and conditioning is experienced prior to continuing. You would think that because the legs are so much stronger than the arms, Chi-Gerk would be easier to learn than Chi-Sao. In general, however, the reverse is true.

Because the legs are stronger, they are usually more prone to "holding in" their strength instead of being able to relax. And because we are so "pre-occupied" with upper body movements, many will usually not place the emphasis required in the lower body until the Chi-Gerk curriculum is introduced.

Those that do will always find that their Chi-Gerk training, when combined with Chi-Sao, is quite superior to a practitioner that has never trained it.

WING CHUN RULES OF CONDUCT  
                                                                 
1. Retain what comes in, send off what retreats. Rush in on loss of hand contact.

2. Do not be lax when your opponent is not advancing.

3. Once your opponent moves, his center of gravity changes.

4. Make the first move to have control. Attack according to timing.

5. Timing is achieved through practice.

6. A strong attitude and posture gives an advantage over your opponent.

7. Being alert and adapting to the situation allows maximum results for minimum effort.

8. The body follows the movement of the hands. The waist and the stance move together.

9. Complement the hands with posture to make good use of the centerline.

10. The eyes and the mind travel together, paying attention to leading edge of attack.

11. Charge into the opponent. Execute three moves together.

12. Strike any presented posture if it is there. Otherwise strike where you see motion. Beware of sneak attacks, leakage attacks and invisible centerline attacks.

13. Soft and relaxed strength will put your opponent in jeopardy.

14. Coordinate the hands and feet. Movement is together.

15. Do not take risks and you will always connect to the target.

16. Have confidence and your calmness will dominate the situation.

17. Occupy the inner gate to strike deep into the defense.

18. To win in an instant is a superior achievement.

19. The Yin Yang principle should be thoroughly understood.

20. The theory of Wing Chun has no limit in it applications.

21. Be humble to request your teacher for guidance.

22. Understand the principles for your training.

23. Upon achieving the highest level of proficiency, the application of techniques will vary according to the opponent.

1. Remain disciplined - Conduct yourself ethically as a martial artist

2. Practice courtesy and righteousness - Serve the society and respect your elders

3. Love your fellow students - Be united and avoid conflicts

4. Limit your desires and pursuit of bodily pleasures - Preserve the proper spirit

5. Train diligently - Maintain your skills

6. Learn to develop spiritual tranquility - Abstain from arguments and fights

7. Participate in society - Be moderate and gentle in your manners

8. Help the weak and the very young - Use martial skills for the good of humanity

9. Pass on the tradition - Preserve this Chinese art and rules of conduct

WING CHUN TRAINING PROVERBS

1. There are not many sets of training exercises in Wing Chun. They are easy to learn but to master them requires determination

2. Learning the usual ways will allow later variations.

3. Short arm bridges and fast steps requires practicing the stance first.

4. Siu Lim Tao mainly trains internal power.

5. Lan Sao in Chum Kiu is a forceful technique.

6. Bui Jee contains life saving emergency techniques.

7. The Wooden Man develops use of power

8. Fancy techniques should not be used in sticky hand practice

9. Sticky leg practice is inseparable from the single leg stance

10. The steps follow turning of the body like a cat

11. The posture complements the hands to eject the opponent

12. The Six and a Half Point Staff does not make more than one sound

13. The Eight Cut Sword techniques have no match

14. The thrusting and fast attacks are well suited for closing in

15. Eyes beaming with courage can neutralize the situation

16. Unknown techniques are not suitable for training practice.

17. Those who completely master the system are among the very few

1. Retain what comes in, send off what retreats. Rush in on loss of hand contact.

2. Do not be lax when your opponent is not advancing.

3. Once your opponent moves, his center of gravity changes.

4. Make the first move to have control. Attack according to timing.

5. Timing is achieved through practice.

6. A strong attitude and posture gives an advantage over your opponent.

7. Being alert and adapting to the situation allows maximum results for minimum effort.

8. The body follows the movement of the hands. The waist and the stance move together.

9. Complement the hands with posture to make good use of the centerline.

10. The eyes and the mind travel together, paying attention to leading edge of attack.

11. Charge into the opponent. Execute three moves together.

12. Strike any presented posture if it is there. Otherwise strike where you see motion. Beware of sneak attacks, leakage attacks and invisible centerline attacks.

13. Soft and relaxed strength will put your opponent in jeopardy.

14. Coordinate the hands and feet. Movement is together.

15. Do not take risks and you will always connect to the target.

16. Have confidence and your calmness will dominate the situation.

17. Occupy the inner gate to strike deep into the defense.

18. To win in an instant is a superior achievement.

19. The Yin Yang principle should be thoroughly understood.

20. The theory of Wing Chun has no limit in it applications.

21. Be humble to request your teacher for guidance.

22. Understand the principles for your training.

23. Upon achieving the highest level of proficiency, the application of techniques will vary according to the opponent.

FORMS & STANCE

YEE JEE KIM YEUNG MA

1. Pull in the chest, push out the upper back, and bring in the tail bone.

2. Fill the Tan Tien with chi and distribute the strength to all parts of the body.

3. Point the knees and toes inward.

4. Form a pyramid with the center of gravity in the center.

5. Fists are placed by the side of the ribs but not touching the body.

6. Sink the elbows, the shoulders, and the waist.

7. Hold the head and neck straight and keep the spirit alert.

8. Eyes are level, looking straight ahead, and watching all directions.

9. The mind is free of distractions and the mood is bright.

10. There is no fear when facing the opponent.

11. Yee Jee Kim Yeung Ma is the main stance.

12. Develop a good foundation for advanced techniques.

                     "Persistent attacks will surely gain you entry. Staying on the defensive too long will surely get you into trouble."


SIU LIM TAO

Siu Lim Tao 小念頭 is most often translated as “little idea”. If we look at the Chinese characters we can understand a more in depth meaning.

小 is understood as meaning “little”.
念 is understood as meaning “think, study”.
頭 is often translated as “head”, but may also mean “first or start”.
The Siu Lim Tao Form is the first open hand form of Wing Chun. There are 108 movements in the form, presented in three parts. The form is conceptual, presenting the concepts of energy, motion and position in a fixed context.

The Stance

Yee Gee Kim Yeung Ma Stance
The Siu Lim Tao form is comprised entirely of the Yee Gee Kim Yeung Ma Stance (Character Two 二 Frontal Adduction Stance). Stepping and turning is not introduced until the second form of Wing Chun, the Chum Kiu form. Attention must be given to correct foot, leg and hip positioning so the stance optimizes its stability, mobility and ability to lever power from the earth. Additional focus must be given to earth points on the bottom of the feet, as well as the hui yum point on the underside of the pelvis to facilitate proper chi flow.
Siu Lim Tao is a single-handed movement; even in the second part you are using both hands symmetrically, so it is still single-handed. ~Ip Chun


The First Section


The first section of the Siu lim Tao form introduces us to two of the seeds or family motions of the Wing Chun Kuen, the tan sau and fook sau. Proper breathing, stance integrity, and relaxation are heavily emphasized to facilitate the development of internal power. However, direct focus and intent must be placed on the underside of the elbow to build jahn dai lik (force/tension beneath the elbow). Careful attention must be given to practicing the motions slowly to facilitate muscle memory.

Seung Guan SauThe motions are as follows:
Seung Guan Sau
Seung Tan Sau
Lop Sau
Sam Pai Fut or Praying Thrice to the Buddha (Slow) Section:
Tan Sau, Huen Sau, Wu Sa
Fook Sau, Tan Sau, Huen Sau, Wu Sau (Repeat 3x)
Pak Sau, Jek Cheung

The Second Section

The second section of the Siu Lim Tao Form, often referred to as the Long Bridge section, teaches us to use the energy that is built in section one, in a combined soft and hard capacity. Here, we start to develop the first aspects of Fa Ging or whipping power. The arm is like a whip; it remains soft and relaxed until the moment of impact when we add last minute energy to the motion, and then become relaxed immediately after. The strike becomes like the crack of the whip only through the use of the soft/hard combination of energies.

seung_fak_sauThe motions are:
Left Side Gum Sau, Right Side Gum Sau,
Rear Gum Sau, Frontal Gum Sau
Lan Sau, Fak Sau, Lan Sau
Jum Sau, Tan Sau, Jut Sau
Bui Sau, Gum Sau, Tai Sau
Ji Si Sau, Lop Sau

The Third Section

In the last third, you are applying the techniques. ~Ip Chun

The third section of the Siu Lim Tao form shows us correct flow and positioning of motions. For example, after practicing the Bong Sau, the third seed of the Wing Chun Kuen, the student drops his elbow into Tan Sau. This sequence reveals the vulnerability of the Wing Arm position. Careful consideration must be given to hand positions while understanding that when an opponent is present hands may need to be adjusted based on the height of the opponent. The movement must be slow and deliberate.

3rd sectionThe motions are:
Pak Sau, Tsang Sau, Huen Sau, Lop Sau (Left Side)
Pak Sau, Tsang Sau, Huen Sau, Lop Sau (Right Side)
Tan Sau, Guan Sau, Tan Sau, Huen Sau, Wang Wa Cheung, Tan Sau, Huen Sau, Lop Sau (Left Side)
Tan Sau, Guan Sau, Tan Sau, Huen Sau, Wang Wa Cheung, Tan Sau, Huen Sau, Lop Sau (Right Side)
Bong Sau, Tan Sau, Tok Sau, Huen Sau, Lop Sau (Left Side)
Bong Sau, Tan Sau, Tok Sau, Huen Sau, Lop Sau (Right Side)
Left Tut Sau, Right Tut Sau, Left Tut Sau
3 Lin Wan Kuen,
Tan Sau, Huen Sau, Lop Sau (Left Side)


1. Siu Lim Tau comes first; Do not force progress in training.

2. A weak body must start with strength improvement.

3. Do not keep any bad habit.

4. Yee Jee Kim Yeung Ma - Train the chi by controlling the Tan Tien.

5. To maintain good balance of strength, grip the ground with the toes.

6. To release chi from the Tan Tien, will enable proper release of power.

7. Sink the elbow and drop the shoulders; Guarding the centerline to protect both flanks.

8. There are one hundred and eight moves, all practical and real; Thousands of variations can be used, aiming for practical use and not beauty.

9. Internally develop the chi; externally train the tendons, bones and muscles.

10. Taun Sau, Bong Sau, Fok Sau, Wu Sau, and Huen Sau; their wonder grows with practice.

11. Each movement must be clear and crisp. Timing must be observed.

12. Practice once a day, more will cause no harm.




Chum Kiu – 尋橋

Chum Kiu (Cham Kiu)- Seeking the Bridge
Chum Kiu – 尋橋 is most often translated as “Seeking the Bridge”. If we look at the Chinese characters we can understand a more in depth meaning.

尋 is understood as meaning “seek, look for”.
橋 is understood as meaning “bridge or idea”.

The Chum Kiu Form is the second open hand form of Wing Chun that puts the lessons learned in Siu Lim Tao into motion and builds upon them. The importance of coordinating footwork and handwork together is paramount. While Siu Lim Tao’s hand motions reference the self, Chum Kiu’s hand and leg motions reference an opponent in relation to the self. From this, we are introduced to several new concepts that either are not seen or not heavily stressed in Siu Lim Tao.

The Stance

While the Chum Kiu Form uses the Yee Gee Kim Yeung Ma stance introduced in Siu Lim Tao, it is in Chum Kiu that we use the Juen Ma/Chum Kiu Ma, Biu Ma and Bik Ma moving stances.
If two objects of the same mass and density, are moving toward each other at the same speed collide, how can one bounce off while the other stands its ground? The answer is that if one of the objects is spinning or twisting as it travels, you can be sure this object will stand its ground, while the other will bounce off. Chum Kiu serves this purpose. ~Ip Ching/Ron Heimberger

Kwok Chum Kiu

Juen Ma/Chum Kiu Ma is used for increasing limb energy and to control the centerline. One of its main attributes is two-way energy, the inseparable forces of Yin and Yang in motion.

Biu Ma is a basic shuffle/step (step slide). It is well suited to compliment the in-close fighting hand techniques of the Wing Chun system. The concept of Biu is to follow the center line straight in when there is no obstruction present.

Bik Ma stance is a pressuring step and a variant of the biu ma used to create pressure and leverage power off the front leg.


The Kicks

There are three kicks presented in Chum Kiu Form:
Tiu Tek (Lifting Kick) may be interpreted as a defensive function of the leg as well as an attack, and uses an upward swinging motion of the leg in coordination with tilting of the pelvis (tiu yiu).
Deang Tek (Nailing Kick) is a nailing kick that mirrors the energy of the Yat Kuen driving into the opponent like a hammer while maintaining stability on one leg.
Realigning Kick emphasizes recovery by regaining the center line from a bad position on the low gate.

Although it is commonly understood that there are only three types of kicks in Chum Kiu, from thorough examination, one can find all eight kicking concepts carefully hidden.

The Wing Chun kicks like hand techniques are non committal and do not compromise the balance of the practitioner in any significant way, due to their exceptional speed but lack of height. ~Samuel Kwok

Like Siu Lim Tao, Chum Kiu Form is comprised of three sections:

First Section

The first section of Chum Kiu teaches us about many concepts that were not introduced in the Siu Lim Tao form and are prevalent through out Chum Kiu. Initially, when we move from Seung Guan Sau to Seung Tan Sau, we use the concept of kwan or rotating as we learn to move around our own arms. It is additionally seen with the turning Bong Sau and Wu Sau. The idea of Yin & Yang or two way energy is first introduced in the Yat Gee Chung Kuen/Lop Sau and is seen in the juen ma/chum kiu ma through out the form. Turn stance also teaches us the concept of Yui Ma power, using our hips and legs for power. The importance of the immovable elbow theory, first introduced in Siu Lim Tao, is now heavily stressed in Chum Kiu. Dynamic use of the upper arm and elbow in combat is introduced in the first section.

The arms must have supplemental help from the legs, hips and torso. With this in mind, it is easy to see why you should never work the hands alone. That would be a feeble and disorganized effort to create power. ~Ip Ching / Ron Heimberger

Second Section

The second section introduces Wing Chun stepping, this, when combined with techniques enables the safe bridging of the gap between the practitioner and his/her opponent. Hence Chum Kiu or ‘seeking the Bridge’. For it is with contact that Wing Chun practitioner has his/her biggest advantage. Furthermore the second section of Chum Kiu is building on Siu Lim Tao by making the practitioner use both footwork and kicks with hand techniques such as blocks.

Also throughout the practice of Chum Kiu the practitioner must use both hands at once. Although this is done in Siu Lim Tao, when both hands are used in the first form they perform the same action whereas in Chum Kiu they do different things, requiring a higher level of ability and concentration form the practitioner. Therefore Chum Kiu builds on Siu Lim Tao.

Third Section

The third section of Chum Kiu expands upon what the practitioner has learned in Siu Lim Tao & the first two sections of Chum Kiu. The Yee Gee Kim Yeung Ma (stance) from the Siu Lim Tao form has a 50/50 weight distribution, while the Chum Kiu Ma (stance) carries its balance or weight on its back leg. The Bik Ma or Pressuring step introduces the practitioner to a forward weight distribution in their footwork. We are also introduced to the Bong Sau in the lower gate, as well as the Double Palm or Po Pei Chang.

The majority of the Kicking Principles lie within the third section, such as the Huen Gerk or Tsiu Yang Chut Gerk (Realigning Kick), where the concept of Recovery is emphasized in the lower gate.

The concepts of Trapping and Fan (continuous motion) are employed with the 45* gum sau (pinning hand) motions and the Lin Wan Kuen, both executed in the closing of the 3rd and final section of the Chum Kiu form.

Fan Sao is used to harness your opponent’s every move. When your opponent attacks, you defend yourself with one hand and attack him with the other. This process continues until you utterly destroy your opponent’s ability to fight. ~Ip Ching/Ron Heimberger

1. Chum Kiu trains the stance and the waist; the arm bridge is short and the step is narrow.

2. Eyes are trained to be alert; the chi flows in a perpetual motion.

3. Strive to remain calm in the midst of motion; loosen up the muscles and relax the mind.

4. Turning the stance with a circular movement, will allow superior generation of power.

5. When the opponent's arm bridge enters my arm bridge, use the escaping hand to turn around the situation.

6. Pass by the opponent's incoming arm bridge from above, without stopping when the countering move has started.

7. Lon Sau and Jip Sau put an opponent in danger.

8. Do not collide with a strong opponent; with a weak opponent use a direct frontal assault.

9. A quick fight should be ended quickly; no delay can be allowed.

10. Use the three joints of the arm to prevent entry by the opponent's bridge; jam the opponent's bridge to restrict his movement.

11. Create a bridge if the opponent's bridge is not present; nullify the bridge according to how it is presented.

12. The arm bridge tracks the movement of the opponent's body; when the hands cannot prevail, use body position to save the situation.

13. Using short range power to jam the opponent's bridge, the three joints are nicely controlled.

14. Where is the opponent's bridge to be found? Chum Kiu guides the way.



Biu Gee


BIU GEE The first part of Biu Gee teaches the student how to perfect the use of ‘inch energy’, enabling the practitioner to develop power through very short distances. It also builds on the two way energy developed in Chum Kiu. The first section also contains footwork is known as circle stepping or Huen Ma. This is essential to the Wing Chun system. Again this builds on the Chum kiu style thrusting stepping or Biu ma. Huen Ma enables the rapid but safe change of direction enabling the practitioner to avoid an attack and swiftly counter attack. The fist section also introduces the practitioner to a technique known as Kop Jarn, or downward elbow. Kop Jarn can be used to attack at very close distance where punching or striking with the hand is not an easy option. It can also be used to block an incoming attack when the practitioner has his/her hands trapped. This is one of the reasons Biu Gee is said to contain emergency escape techniques. Other emergency techniques are seen in Biu Gee, for example the use of Biu Gee/Tse to escape when the elbow has been pinned. The last part of the form contains ways to recover the centreline along with some large areas covers and strikes to different directions. The final part of the form shows the student an effective way to recover from a fall. Therefore Biu Gee completes the hand forms of the Wing Chun system by finalising the use of power and energy in techniques, building on the Chun Kiu style stepping and providing the practitioner with options to escape a bad situation such as being pinned, trapped or recovering from a fall. Because Biu Gee builds on Chum Kiu which itself builds on Sil Lim Tao, it should only be learned after Chum Kiu has been properly understood. Once Biu Gee has been mastered the practitioner can deliver devastating power through extremely short distances with much greater accuracy.


1. The Biu Jee hand contains emergency techniques.

2. Iron fingers can strike a vital point at once.

3. The stepping in elbow strike has sufficient threatening power.

4. The phoenix eye punch has no compassion.

5. Fak Sau, Ginger Fist, and Guide Bridge; their movements are closely coordinated and hard to defend and nullify.

6. Springy power and the extended arm are applied to close range.

7. The situation is different when preventing from defeat in an emergency.

8. The Biu Jee is not taught to outsiders.

9. How many Sifu pass on the proper heritage?


 
MUK YAN JONG

1. There are 108 movements for the Wooden Man; repeated practice brings proper use of power.

2. Steps vary and always maintain close contact with the Wooden Man.

3. Power starts from the heart and shoots towards the centerline of the Mok Yan Jong.

4. Up, down, back and forth, the movements are continuous.

5. Power improvement cannot be predicted.

6. The arm bridge sticks to the hands of the Wooden Man while moving; adhesion power when achieved will be a threatening force.

7. Power can be released in the intended manner; use of the line and position will be proper and hard to defeat.

 

Wing Chun Women’s Self-Defense Course in your City.


Wing Chun Women’s Self-Defense Course will be held in the early spring. Date is forthcoming.

Wing Chun Women’s Self-Defense Course is a your City Self- Defense Course based on the the Principles & Concepts of Wing Chun Kung Fu. It is a 2 Week Course that consists of action packed classes with hands on training. You will learn to deal with grappling situations such as hair grabs, arm grabs, chokes, and bear hugs; ground fighting situations including the prevention of being mounted & rape scenarios. You will practice defending yourself while striking with structural power, and will learn to overcome force through positioning and proper energy. This course is designed to teach you the basics of what you need to know in a self-defense situation.

This course is taught by Si-fu Vangelis Xanthakis , and is for Women only.

Please contact  Si Fu  Vangelis Xanthakis  if you are interested in this new, upcoming course. +302130428065 Fax- +30 6983197978 Mob.or Contact With Email vangelis.xanthakis@gmail.com

 

       

 


TEL/FAX :( +30) 213-0428065 - +30-6983197978  +30-6974803512
 50 ARIVVOU - VIRONAS, ATHENS
 BYRON, 16232 GREECE
 

                       EMAIL: vangelis.xanthakis@gmail.com

                 

2016 Copyright Muay Boran(Greece) - All Rights Reserved